COVID-19 Information
Riverview Health

COVID-19 Information and Visitor Restrictions

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COVID-19 FAQ

Riverview Health Closing Physician Offices

Effective Monday, March 23

In an effort to slow the spread of COVID-19, Riverview Health will close all but three primary care offices and limit hours for orthopedics offices beginning Monday, March 23.

The three primary care offices that will remain open include Noblesville Family Medicine, Sheridan Family Medicine and Hazel Dell Family Care. The open orthopedics offices will be Riverview Health Orthopedics & Sports Medicine in Carmel and Riverview Health Orthopedics & Sports Medicine in Westfield.

Patients will be contacted to reschedule. Patients needing to schedule an appointment, refill a prescription or otherwise consult with their provider should call their physician’s office, as phones will still be answered and messages returned. No walk-ins will be allowed at any of the open offices.

Riverview Health Visitor Restrictions

Noblesville—Riverview Health announced at 3 p.m. on Monday, March 16, that effective immediately no visitors will be allowed except for:

  • One dedicated support person in maternity
  • Situations involving end-of-life care,
  • Pediatric patients

Those individuals in outpatient procedural areas will be allowed one visitor at a time to accompany them. Allowed visitors must not have any flu-like symptoms and must be immediate family, parent, spouse or significant other.

In addition, beginning Tuesday, March 17, Riverview Health will limit surgical cases on a case-by-case basis, and we will temporarily close our Riverview Health Physicians Orthopedics & Sports Medicine Walk-in Clinics.

We have canceled all public seminars, classes and support groups until further notice. We've also closed our two Riverview Health Rehab & Fitness locations to fitness clients, but rehab and therapy appointments will continue as scheduled. As we work to provide a safe environment for our patients, staff and community, we apologize for any inconvenience these visitation restrictions may cause. We will continue to monitor conditions and remove the restrictions as soon as it is safe to do so.

Face Mask Donations

How to Make a Face Mask

If you or your organization is interested in sewing face masks to donate to Riverview Health, please review the below information to ensure your homemade mask offers the most protection to the wearer.

  • For supplies, you will need tightly woven cotton fabric (Tip: Use a different pattern of fabric for the outside of the mask than on the inside to decrease the chance of users putting them on backwards).
  • For patterns and video instructions to get you started, click here.
  • Email info@riverview.org to coordinate donation drop-offs

N95 Mask Donations

Riverview Health is accepting donations of N95 masks from individuals or organizations. If you wish to coordinate a drop-off time for your donation, email info@riverview.org.


COVID-FAQ

What is COVID-19 (also known as “coronavirus”)?
      This respiratory virus was first detected in Wuhan City, Hubei Province, China. The first infections were linked to a live animal market, but the virus is now spreading from person-to-person. It’s important to note that person-to-person spread can happen on a continuum. Some viruses are highly contagious (like measles), while other viruses are less so.
      The virus that causes COVID-19 seems to be spreading easily and sustainably in the community (“community spread”) in some affected geographic areas. Community spread means people have been infected with the virus in an area, including some who are not sure how or where they became infected.
What are the symptoms?
      Reported illnesses have ranged from mild symptoms to severe illness and death for confirmed coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) cases.
      The following symptoms may appear 2-14 days after exposure.
      • Fever
      • Cough
      • Shortness of breath

 

What is Riverview Health doing in response to COVID-19?
      We are monitoring the situation daily. In addition to our already rigorous cleaning with hospital-grade products, we’ve implemented the following proactive changes to protect patients, families, staff and the community from any potential exposure:

Visitor Restrictions––Effective Immediately
      No visitors will be allowed except for:
      • One dedicated support person in maternity
      • Situations involving end-of-life care
      • Pediatric patients
      Those individuals in outpatient procedural areas will be allowed one visitor at a time to accompany them. Allowed visitors must not have any flu-like symptoms and must be immediate family, parent, spouse or significant other.

Altered Cafeteria Food Availability
      We’ve moved menu items, such as the salad bar, that are typically available for self-service to the kitchen where these items can be available upon request.

Signage and Hand Sanitizer Placements
      We’ve placed signage at all entrances of both hospitals to ask sick patients to use a facemask. We also have mobile hand sanitizer stations placed throughout our facilities.

Seminars, Classes, Support Groups and Fitness
      We have canceled all public seminars, classes and support groups until further notice. We've also closed our two Riverview Health Rehab & Fitness locations to fitness clients, but rehab and therapy appointments will continue as scheduled.


Who is at higher risk for serious illness?
      Early information out of China, where COVID-19 first started, shows that some people are at higher risk of getting very sick from this illness including older adults, and people who have serious chronic medical conditions like heart disease, diabetes, and lung disease.
      If you are at higher risk of getting very sick from COVID-19, you should: stock up on supplies; take everyday precautions to keep space between yourself and others; when you go out in public, keep away from others who are sick; limit close contact and wash your hands often; and avoid crowds, cruise travel, and non-essential travel. If there is an outbreak in your community, stay home as much as possible. Watch for symptoms and emergency signs. If you get sick, stay home and call your doctor.
What are the symptoms?
      Reported illnesses have ranged from mild symptoms to severe illness and death for confirmed coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) cases.
      The following symptoms may appear 2-14 days after exposure.
      • Fever
      • Cough
      • Shortness of breath

 

What can be done to prevent and treat it and how does it spread?
      There is currently no vaccine to prevent coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The best way to prevent illness is to avoid being exposed to this virus. The virus is thought to spread mainly from person-to-person such as:
      • Between people who are in close contact with one another (within about 6 feet).
      • Through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs or sneezes. These droplets can land in the mouths or noses of people who are nearby or possibly be inhaled into the lungs.
      Take these measures to help prevent the spread of the virus:
      • Frequently wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds at a time. This is especially important after you’ve been in a public place, or after blowing your nose, coughing or sneezing.
      • If soap and water aren’t available, use hand sanitizer that contains at least 60 percent alcohol.
      • Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth with unwashed hands.
      • Clean and disinfect surfaces that are frequently touched.

 

Should I wear a face mask in public?
      In an effort to prevent a possible shortage of facemasks for healthcare workers and first responders:
      If you are NOT sick, you do not need to wear a face mask unless you’re caring for someone who is sick and they cannot wear a mask.
      If you ARE sick, you should wear a facemask when you’re around other people and before entering a healthcare provider’s office or hospital. If you’re not able to wear a mask, you should cover your coughs and sneezes with the crook of your elbow.
What should I do if I am sick?
      • View our home care instructions >>
      • Stay home: People who are mildly ill with COVID-19 are able to isolate at home during their illness. You should restrict activities outside your home, except for getting medical care.
      • Avoid public areas: Do not go to work, school or public areas.
      • Avoid public transportation: Avoid using public transportation, ride-sharing, or taxis.
      • Separate yourself from other people and animals in your home as much as possible by staying in a separate room and using a separate bathroom.
      • Call ahead before visiting your doctor, an ER or urgent care facility, and tell them that you have or may have COVID-19.
      • Wear a facemask when you’re around other people and before entering a healthcare provider’s office or hospital. If you’re not able to wear a mask, you should cover your coughs and sneezes with the crook of your elbow.
      • Frequently wash your hands with soap and water for at least 20 seconds at a time. This is especially important after you’ve been in a public place, or after blowing your nose, coughing or sneezing.
      • If soap and water aren’t available, use hand sanitizer that contains at least 60 percent alcohol.
      • Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth with unwashed hands.
      • Clean and disinfect surfaces that are frequently touched.

 

If I’m isolating myself, how long do I need to stay home?
      • Stay at home until instructed to leave: Patients with confirmed COVID-19 should remain under home isolation precautions until the risk of secondary transmission to others is thought to be low. View our home care instructions >>
      • Talk to your healthcare provider: The decision to discontinue home isolation precautions should be made on a case-by-case basis, in consultation with healthcare providers and state and local health departments.

 

Will warm weather stop the outbreak of COVID-19?
      It’s unknown whether weather and temperature affect the spread of COVID-19. Some other viruses, like the common cold and flu, spread more during cold weather months but that does not mean it is impossible to become sick with these viruses during other months. At this time, it is not known whether the spread of COVID-19 will decrease when weather becomes warmer. There is much more to learn about the transmissibility, severity, and other features associated with COVID-19 and investigations are ongoing.